History of Massachusetts

Before the Europeans arrived, Massachusetts was owned by some Native American forks like the Penacook, the Nauset, the Nipmuc, the Wampanoag, the Mohican, the Mohegan, and the Narragansett. But later all these people were eliminated by smallpox when the Europeans arrived first in North America.

In the year 1620, the pilgrims who originated from England arrived on Mayflower, and they established a colony at Plymouth. Also, the pilgrims suffered from smallpox just like the Native Americans did. But later Wampanoags, however, helped them, and in 1621 they celebrated with the Native Americans their first Thanksgiving. The English settlers were also known by the Native Americans to be Yengeeze, and this is where the work Yankee originated.

 

In the decades that are following pilgrims were followed by Puritans who they later established a colony at Boston, as well as Quakers and the Anglicans. But there were religious inconveniences, with Quakerism stopped, and some Quakers were hanged in the Boston colony.

 

In the period of King James II of England who was a catholic outspoken, and the charter was annulled by the Massachusetts Bay colony. The New England formed a short-lived dominion, but the colonials overthrew the Royal governor. After James was defeated the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the colony of Plymouth was merged, and in 1692 they were granted a new royal charter.

 

In the 19th century Massachusetts it became a leader in the industrialization area. In 1826 the United States railroad and granite railway was established. Massachusetts has been the first state to prove that slavery was unpermitted. Abolitionism sentiment and activity grew in the country in around half of the 19th century. In the 20th century, Massachusetts had a stable industrial economy and with the Boston who served as the most crucial port in the country. But later the economy began to depreciate in the 1920s, and the state was downgraded by the great depression that took place in 1929.